Topics

Advice for POD version


Jill Culiner
 

Hello everyone,
Yes, I know this is a topic that has been tackled many times, and I didn’t pay attention. However, I now need your advice: I have a non-fiction book that is available as an ebook but the paper version is out of print. The few remaining copies are listed at astronomical prices. People still do (sometimes) ask for paper versions, so I would like to make one available. How have you done this sort of thing? Keeping it just on Amazon seems a silly idea so I’d like to have it made available elsewhere, too. Can I do this? Does the process cost money? Since it has already been published, it no longer needs editing or a cover.  What should I do?
Hugs to all of you,
Jill (J. Arlene) Culiner


Cynthia Terelst
 

You could also publish through Ingram Spark. 


On 21 Nov 2020, at 6:34 pm, Jill Culiner <romance@...> wrote:


Hello everyone,
Yes, I know this is a topic that has been tackled many times, and I didn’t pay attention. However, I now need your advice: I have a non-fiction book that is available as an ebook but the paper version is out of print. The few remaining copies are listed at astronomical prices. People still do (sometimes) ask for paper versions, so I would like to make one available. How have you done this sort of thing? Keeping it just on Amazon seems a silly idea so I’d like to have it made available elsewhere, too. Can I do this? Does the process cost money? Since it has already been published, it no longer needs editing or a cover.  What should I do?
Hugs to all of you,
Jill (J. Arlene) Culiner


 

I'd like to know this too. I imagine it's a matter of clicking the button on the product "I have one for sale". It used to be there near the price. I've heard those books with super high prices can be part of money laundering. seems a slow way to go about it, but maybe it's bigger than it looks. Any rate, I'll be watching this thread for info! Great question.
--

Kayelle Allen
Founder, Marketing for Romance Writers
www.kayelleallen.com Share your book www.rlfblog.com


Liese Sherwood-Fabre
 

Hi, all!
There are a few different ways to make POD books:
1) If you're already on Amazon, they make it very easy to create a paperback (I think they now have a button that says "Make a paperback" or something like that.) Even if you don't want to do that, they provide templates for the interior as well as book cover (you'll have to upload a spine and back, but they provide a template for the size). I did my first books this way.

 Big warning: author copies will come with a strip in the middle of the book cover saying "NOT FOR RESALE." If you want copies for book signing (when those happen again), you'll want to order them at full price (not author copies)

2) B&N has a program where you can upload your book for POD either as a private book or for sale. I use the private (personal) option for books I make for a local Sherlock group that puts out.a book for their own members and not for sale. Same printer, etc, but no need to have an ISBN. If you don't want to list these at B&N for sale, they are cheaper than any of the other PODs I could find (Lulu, etc.)

If you want to sell on B&N, you can do that too. They will supply an ISBN, if you want, but then it is listed as published by B&N.

3) IngramSpark will produce and distribute your books to bigger platform (Draft2Digital will too, but I'm not familiar with them)--unless you tell them (there's an exclusion you can check for Amazon and Apple), they will go to Amazon, Apple, B&N, Kobo, etc. both eBook and paperback. The drawback: they require an ISBN and it will be on sale (why I like B&N for the personal/private option). They have a really archaic book cover program and I use a professional to help me with getting it right for the paperbacks (I don't have the right software and prefer to us my book cover designer to do it than to pull out my hair). There's a charge for uploading, but they have a discount code that drops it to $0: FREE2020. Sign up for the blog and you'll find out what the new code is).

Any more questions, please ask.

Best,
Liese


Nola Li Barr
 

Liese, just saw your email and wanted to say that for Amazon, only the proof copy has the "Not for resale banner." Author copies don't have the banner. If you plan on printing from Amazon and selling you should definitely get the author copies so you can make a profit on them. 

IngramSpark - there's always a free code to be found somewhere. They post and send them out for holidays, conferences, blogs etc.

I usually use my Amazon cover for IngramSpark too. It pops up the warning messages but it's never been a problem. 

I haven't known that about B&N. Thanks for sharing!

~Nola


On Sat, Nov 21, 2020, 6:31 AM Liese Sherwood-Fabre via groups.io <liesesf=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi, all!
There are a few different ways to make POD books:
1) If you're already on Amazon, they make it very easy to create a paperback (I think they now have a button that says "Make a paperback" or something like that.) Even if you don't want to do that, they provide templates for the interior as well as book cover (you'll have to upload a spine and back, but they provide a template for the size). I did my first books this way.

 Big warning: author copies will come with a strip in the middle of the book cover saying "NOT FOR RESALE." If you want copies for book signing (when those happen again), you'll want to order them at full price (not author copies)

2) B&N has a program where you can upload your book for POD either as a private book or for sale. I use the private (personal) option for books I make for a local Sherlock group that puts out.a book for their own members and not for sale. Same printer, etc, but no need to have an ISBN. If you don't want to list these at B&N for sale, they are cheaper than any of the other PODs I could find (Lulu, etc.)

If you want to sell on B&N, you can do that too. They will supply an ISBN, if you want, but then it is listed as published by B&N.

3) IngramSpark will produce and distribute your books to bigger platform (Draft2Digital will too, but I'm not familiar with them)--unless you tell them (there's an exclusion you can check for Amazon and Apple), they will go to Amazon, Apple, B&N, Kobo, etc. both eBook and paperback. The drawback: they require an ISBN and it will be on sale (why I like B&N for the personal/private option). They have a really archaic book cover program and I use a professional to help me with getting it right for the paperbacks (I don't have the right software and prefer to us my book cover designer to do it than to pull out my hair). There's a charge for uploading, but they have a discount code that drops it to $0: FREE2020. Sign up for the blog and you'll find out what the new code is).

Any more questions, please ask.

Best,
Liese


Jill Culiner
 

Thank you, Liese. I’ve looked into IngramSpark and it sounds good. Draft2Digital might even be better, but they are only doing ebooks, not POD at the moment (although they will in the future). The archaic book cover sounds a bit frightening. What do you mean by that?

De : "Liese Sherwood-Fabre via groups.io" <liesesf@...>
Répondre à : <main@marketingforromancewriters.groups.io>
Date : Sat, 21 Nov 2020 14:31:11 +0000 (UTC)
À : "main@marketingforromancewriters.groups.io" <main@marketingforromancewriters.groups.io>
Objet : Re: [mfrwio] Advice for POD version

Hi, all!
There are a few different ways to make POD books:
1) If you're already on Amazon, they make it very easy to create a paperback (I think they now have a button that says "Make a paperback" or something like that.) Even if you don't want to do that, they provide templates for the interior as well as book cover (you'll have to upload a spine and back, but they provide a template for the size). I did my first books this way.

 Big warning: author copies will come with a strip in the middle of the book cover saying "NOT FOR RESALE." If you want copies for book signing (when those happen again), you'll want to order them at full price (not author copies)

2) B&N has a program where you can upload your book for POD either as a private book or for sale. I use the private (personal) option for books I make for a local Sherlock group that puts out.a book for their own members and not for sale. Same printer, etc, but no need to have an ISBN. If you don't want to list these at B&N for sale, they are cheaper than any of the other PODs I could find (Lulu, etc.)

If you want to sell on B&N, you can do that too. They will supply an ISBN, if you want, but then it is listed as published by B&N.

3) IngramSpark will produce and distribute your books to bigger platform (Draft2Digital will too, but I'm not familiar with them)--unless you tell them (there's an exclusion you can check for Amazon and Apple), they will go to Amazon, Apple, B&N, Kobo, etc. both eBook and paperback. The drawback: they require an ISBN and it will be on sale (why I like B&N for the personal/private option). They have a really archaic book cover program and I use a professional to help me with getting it right for the paperbacks (I don't have the right software and prefer to us my book cover designer to do it than to pull out my hair). There's a charge for uploading, but they have a discount code that drops it to $0: FREE2020. Sign up for the blog and you'll find out what the new code is).

Any more questions, please ask.

Best,
Liese


Liese Sherwood-Fabre
 

Hi, Jill!

1) Although others seem not to have problems with IngramSpark covers, I did. It may be me.

Here's a place where it will provide you with the template needed to create the cover:

https://myaccount.ingramspark.com/Portal/Tools/CoverTemplateGenerator

I don't have InDesign, but it does allow PDFs as well.

I use Killion publishing to create my covers and they provide with the template needed for upload for paperback covers.

2) I checked on the "author copies" at KDP and saw that the book must be "live" to get the copies without the resale banner. Might have been my problem. I wanted to check out the book before I published it. 

3) I use B&N personal books to create my ARCs. Some organizations require a "marketing plan" as part of the review process. A friend who is traditionally published shared with me an example from one of her books. They can be slow sometimes, and I've used Lulu as well for these ARCs (check for a discount code, but still a bit higher than B&N).

4) Google "IngramSpark vs. KDP" and you'll find a lot of reasons for using both avenues. Basically, bookstores won't buy from KDP, but they will from IngramSpark, and IngramSpark has a wide reach there.

That's my experience.

Liese



Jill Culiner
 

Thanks so much, Liese, for your help. And yes, I did get my rights back and my partner, who is a graphic designer, is doing a lovely cover using my own photo. So far Ingram is a bit confusing because I’m not certain how to get the ISBN through them. They mention that it’s possible, but they don’t say HOW to do it.

De : "Liese Sherwood-Fabre via groups.io" <liesesf@...>
Répondre à : <main@marketingforromancewriters.groups.io>
Date : Sun, 22 Nov 2020 07:45:01 -0800
À : <main@marketingforromancewriters.groups.io>
Objet : Re: [mfrwio] Advice for POD version

Hi, Jill!

1) Although others seem not to have problems with IngramSpark covers, I did. It may be me.

Here's a place where it will provide you with the template needed to create the cover:

https://myaccount.ingramspark.com/Portal/Tools/CoverTemplateGenerator

I don't have InDesign, but it does allow PDFs as well.

I use Killion publishing to create my covers and they provide with the template needed for upload for paperback covers.

2) I checked on the "author copies" at KDP and saw that the book must be "live" to get the copies without the resale banner. Might have been my problem. I wanted to check out the book before I published it. 

3) I use B&N personal books to create my ARCs. Some organizations require a "marketing plan" as part of the review process. A friend who is traditionally published shared with me an example from one of her books. They can be slow sometimes, and I've used Lulu as well for these ARCs (check for a discount code, but still a bit higher than B&N).

4) Google "IngramSpark vs. KDP" and you'll find a lot of reasons for using both avenues. Basically, bookstores won't buy from KDP, but they will from IngramSpark, and IngramSpark has a wide reach there.

That's my experience.

Liese